The real threats to public health

I’ve told you before what German measles (Rubella) can do to an unborn baby. Lucky for us, the virus is covered in the MMR vaccine, a very good vaccine with a very good record of safety and effectiveness. We’re also lucky that the virus only has us as its reservoir. Immunize enough of us around the world, and the virus is eradicated. Period.

Unfortunately, there are people out there who more than likely have a mental disorder. Why a mental disorder? Because only psychopaths would knowingly endanger others and knowingly spread rubella (or mumps, or measles). Let me make this clear: Pregnant women have a diminished immune system, and they are very susceptible to these infections. If you spread rubella, or any other thing, you risk killing a child in the most painful way possible. These psychopaths go on social networks and network with each other, agreeing to report to each other if someone in their unvaccinated families contracts measles, mumps, rubella, or chickenpox. They then coordinate parties to get their children, and each other, exposed to these diseases. In some cases, they even agree to mail each other lollipops that sick children have licked.

It is disgusting, and it is extremely dangerous. Reasonable people see this. These psychopaths don’t. And, yes, I’m using that term to keep myself from calling them other names. Here’s the evidence, off of Facebook:

rubella_1 rubella_2

chickenpox_2 chickenpox_1

 

chickenpox_3

I am looking into each and every one of those names there, and I will not hesitate to contact the proper health protection authorities in the places where they live. The threat is just too great.

And, by the way, you psychopaths out there, if you’re reading this, the reason you’re having to resort to these idiotic tactics is because of the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

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“Immunize vs. Vaccinate” from two perspectives

If you’ve read some of the mind-numbing comment posts about vaccination, you’ll will undoubtedly come across the following argument:

“Vaccination is not the same as immunization!”

That statement means different things to different people. To us scientists, it’s a “truism.” Vaccination is a way to immunize, so is a natural infectious process. Both may not immunize if the person getting the vaccine or the disease doesn’t react to the vaccine or the disease in a way that creates immunity. For example, there are plenty of people who are “non-responders” to the hepatitis B vaccine. That is, they don’t make detectable antibodies against hepatitis B when they go through the vaccination series. They’re not considered immune, but they are also not excluded from working in healthcare and other “risky” professions. Why? Because the jury is out as to whether or not non-responders are really not immune. That is, we don’t really know if they’ll be protected or not. But, by taking the vaccine series, they did the best they could to be protected, short of using personal protective equipment and universal precautions.

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